Baptism
Welcome to the Christian community!

Given the connection to the community, Baptism is celebrated within the context of regular worship at times of the year appropriate to the themes of Baptism.  Ideal times include: the Baptism of Jesus (typically the second Sunday in January), the Easter Vigil and during the Easter Season, Harvest Thanksgiving and the Celebration of All Saints (Nov. 1st).  Preparation preceding the celebration includes activities, a parish companion to act as a liaison between the candidates, their families and the congregations, and a presentation of the candidates in worship. 

Holy Communion
Welcome to the Feast!

As an Anglican Church we celebrate Holy Communion during worship on most Sundays throughout the year.  Communion can be a grace-filled opportunity to experience God’s loving presence through the Body of Christ.  To help young people better understand the meaning associated with this action we offer a special program aimed at those who are ready and interested in receiving Communion for the first time and those who have been receiving but would like a fuller understanding of what it is they are doing.

Confirmation
A mature expression of faith

The sacrament of Confirmation provides an opportunity for candidates to profess their faith as mature individuals and make a commitment to live a Christian life following the example of Jesus and inspired by the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Confirmation is celebrated by the Bishop.  This service can also include opportunities to Receive individuals into the Anglican tradition from other traditions and/or the option to Reaffirm one's faith.

Marriage
What God has joined together

The sacrament of marriage is a sacred opportunity for a couple to profess their love and commitment for each other before God and the congregation gathered.  It is a beautiful way to remember that all love comes from God and that our love for each other as married couples is strengthened and nourished through our participation in community life including that expressed in worship.

All couples legally able to marry in Ontario are welcome to participate in the sacrament of marriage.  The expectation is that at least one member of the couple be Baptised and the couple needs to participate in marriage preparation.

Anointing of the Sick
Special prayers at a difficult time

During times of illness it is important to know God’s loving presence.  The Anglican tradition offers an opportunity for those who are experiencing illness or are close to death to participate in special prayers and be anointed with oil as a sign of our connection to a loving, forgiving God.

Reconciliation
A time to know God's love, grace, and forgiveness

Poor choices, mistakes, sins can weigh heavy on our hearts.  It can be particularly healing to confess our sins and experience God’s loving forgiveness in an intimate way.  The Anglican tradition thus offers opportunities for individual confession and reconciliation. 

Ordination
A special calling by God

Following an appropriate period of training and discernment, the Anglican tradition includes rituals for the ordination of deacons (individuals who are called to a particular ministry within the Church which could include pastoral care, street ministry, chaplaincy, etc), priests (individuals who are called to administer the sacraments in the service of God’s people) and Bishops (who provide leadership for the Churches in a Diocese).

The Trinity Icon
Rublev’s Trinity

"The primary feature of the icon is the characters and positioning of the three angels, which Rublev rightly interprets as being a Theophany, or showing forth of God, through the “Type” (prefiguration) of the angelic figures.  Typically read from left to right we see each angelic figure bearing the same facial and body characteristics, but with differing postures and clothing.  The Unity and Communion of the Godhead is expressed by their similarities and in the complementary of the symmetry of the figures.  The circular formation around the table (a Type of the Altar of Sacrifice and the Altar of the Cross), expresses this symmetry. And the angelic figures accentuate this.

The heads of the angels are tilted in deference to and in a communication of love between the three. This is a beautiful expression of the life of the Trinity, and reveals how there is no position of domination over each other within the Godhead. This also expresses how their hypostatic union is without confusion, separation or co-mingling. Each figure carries a staff or scepter in their left-hand, showing forth their Sovereignty and Power". 

by Kyleska